How I Started a Sanitary Napkin Revolution!

  • Posted in:
October 27, 2016
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Filmed May 2012, in Bangalore as part of the TED Global Talent Search. Originally published on the TED Talk website, you can view this talk and transcript in multiple languages. To view the video, visit this link or click the image above.

 

When he realized his wife had to choose between buying family meals and buying her monthly “supplies,” Arunachalam Muruganantham vowed to help her solve the problem of the sanitary pad. His research got very very personal — and led him to a powerful business model.

Why you should listen

Arunachalam Muruganantham of Jayaashree Industries designed, created, tested and implemented a sanitary napkin-making machine that operates on a small scale.

Contrary to a large-scale production model which requires Rs.3.5 Crores as initial investment, Jayaashree Industries sanitary napkin-making machine can be made available to a buyer for approximately Rs.65,000. This allows smaller players to adopt the business model propagated by him, and thus generates more employment and wealth in the most neglected sections of society. More specifically, an empowerment forum – such as a Self Help Group or a women’s group – can invest in a sanitary napkin-making unit to create a business that employs up to ten women. The new invention is capable of making 120 napkins per hour.

The Jayaashree Industries model helps offer livelihood, hygiene, dignity and empowerment to underprivileged women all over the world. And it does so using a sustainable business framework.

What others say

“’My vision is to make India a 100% napkin-using country,’ said Muruganantham at the INK conference in Jaipur. ‘We can create 1 million employment opportunities for rural women and expand the model to other developing nations.’” — FastCo.Exist

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About the Arunachalam
 
Arunachalam Muruganantham is a social entrepreneur from Coimbatore in Tamil Nadu, India. He is the inventor of a low-cost sanitary pad making machine and has innovated grass-roots mechanisms for generating awareness about traditional unhygienic practices around menstruation in rural India. His mini-machines, which can manufacture sanitary pads for less than a third of the cost of commercial pads, have been installed in 23 of the 29 states of India.
 
He is currently planning to expand the production of these machines to 106 nations. In 2014, TIME magazine placed him in its list of  the 100 Most Influential People in the World.  In 2016, he was awarded Padma Shri by Government of India
 

 

 

 

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