Girls’ Learning and Empowerment – The Role of School Environments

October 10, 2016

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UNGEI and ODI have teamed up to develop a rigorous review on the impact of school environments on girls’ learning outcomes. Our ‘Girls’ Learning and Empowerment – The Role of School Environments’ rigorous review report finds that, despite major increases in girls’ access to education and improvement in girls’ learning outcomes over the past decade, gender inequalities persist, and are particularly stark in many low-income countries. Given the developmental benefits of education – for individual girls, their families and communities, and wider society – these inequalities represent significant lost opportunities.

The review identifies a number of key knowledge gaps for effective policy and practice, both to support effective learning and to realise the empowering potential of girls’ education:

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Evidence on the impact of key strategies to enhance quality of education: relatively few studies of effective learning and teaching strategies disaggregate their findings by sex.

The cost-effectiveness of different approaches to enhancing the quality of education in general and girls’ learning outcomes in particular.

The impact of investments in infrastructure on learning outcomes: most evidence focuses on enrolment, retention or attendance.

The potential and limitations of alternative learning environments for girls such as open learning, flexible learning or distance learning. This could be particularly important for girls (and boys) in remote areas and for those with restricted access to education, such as young married girls.

 

Ahead of the release of the full report this October 11 on International Day of the Girl Child, you can read an overview of the key findings here in the Policy Brief: Girls’ Learning and Empowerment – The role of school environments. Stay posted to the UNGEI website and twitter account for all the latest research and insights into girls’ education.

 

 

 

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